An Overview Of Heritage Law In The UK

While the UK is a small country compared to most, no less does it bear the marks of its predecessors. These areas of the surroundings which display past interaction between people and places are called the historic environment.

The historic environment includes many areas which have been considered important to society, and are protected by law. These are called heritage assets and make up the parts of the historic environment that is considered of great value.

Laws offers protection for heritage assets, and these laws have developed over the years. They help define what exactly makes a heritage asset, why it is valued and worthy of protection. These laws refer to various architectural, historic, artistic, traditional and archaeological interests, including the character that derives from those attributes.

Terms such as ‘significance’, are defined and encompass many different interests that may be worthy of the designation of a heritage asset. These interests may be archaeological, architectural, artistic or historic.

 

Why Conveyancing Checks Are Important

Conveyancing is the transfer of a legal title from one person to another. Usually carried out by a lawyer, conveyancing is a process used commonly when properties are bought and sold.

During a conveyancing process there are a variety of different checks that have to be done for the process to be a legal transfer.  These checks are important because, they involve making sure that the site is occupied legally, that the property isn’t threatened by any redevelopments in the area or that the property isn’t subject to a compulsory purchase order. All of which are important for people who want their new property purchase to be a legal one.

The Government has plans to introduce online conveyancing which will involve the online registration of land. This will ultimately dispose of the necessity for lengthy background searches and make purchasing property much easier and more secure for the buyer.

Differentiating Between Short Term And Long Term Investments

A typical short term investment is expected to grow for several months. If the investment is successful it can extend to a period of a few years, which is the ideal outcome for a short term investment. For an investment to become long term, the time periods are much longer — often decades.

Long term investments include real estate and cash, these slowly develop over much longer periods. But this isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

Because of the amount of time that long term investments occupy, they often leave room for many short-term investments. Examples of short term investments include individual stocks and mutual funds.  If you know you need the money back in the short-term, the stock market is a good place to be.

It’s important to remember that the long term investment account differs largely from the short term investment account in that short term investments will most likely be sold, where as long term investments may never be sold.

Financing Intellectual Properties

Many creative companies hinge on maintaining the exclusive use of their intellectual properties (IPs). Being the only company that produces something from a certain IP is not only a financially viable way of doing business, but its also the law if that company owns the IP.

Its for this reason that upper management and policy makers should care deeply about the IPs that they hold. Its also why the latest trends in financing IP assets should be paid attention to. IP rights are not only valuable assets but can also be important sources of financing. The desire to enhance innovation is a important concern for creative companies, and access to financing is crucial for start-up companies.

Rights to the exclusive use of an IP can increases a company’s asset value, and understanding the value of the IP can have a knock on effect in making informed decisions in the future. This helps upper management to negotiate more effectively with other companies, and facilitate access to credit.

Understanding Travel Insurance Policies

Travel insurance is broken up into two different categories, these are the policy types. The first is a single trip policy. This only covers one trip per policy taken out. The second type of policy is the annual multi trip policy. This covers a traveller for every trip made over the course of a year.

A single-trip policy is best for people who know they will only be taking one holiday over a 12-month period. So its recommended for most travellers who are taking just one overseas trip a year. Where as annual cover is suited for heavy travellers who know they will be making multiple journeys over the course of the year.

A competitive, single-trip policy costs a lot less at £4.11, when compared with annual cover, which starts at around £25. However, if you know you will be making more than one trip abroad then annual insurance might be cheaper than buying several single trip policies, especially if you are going long-haul.